Month: September 2021

The Human Factor in Architecture

The Human Factor in Architecture

Another majestic building of the city is the Fountain. İt is an interesting case that the Caunians had never and ever designed a city without a fountain. İt was for visitors coming from distant seas to freshen up. The fountain that also functioned as a meeting point for women at the time, is being reconstructed now for the modern visitors. But it will take a little more time to drink or fill the bottles with freezing waters.

The most striking stage of the journey is the Necropolis. Of 167 tombs, ‘The Temple Faced Ones’ engraved into rocky cliffs belong to the noble inhabitants of Caunos. These sfone Tombs are the symbols of the city. By the way, fhe tradition of engraving tombs into the rocks, comes from Palestine and Gyria to Anatolia, and spreads to Italy.

The Future of Antiquity

Archaelogist Cengiz Isık, the leader of team that developes applicable restoration projects, emphasized on two points about th

Byblis was beside herself

Troubled thoughts perplexed her… ‘What will become of me? Away, perverted passion! Let me love my brother with a proper sister’s love! Yet if his love had first been fired by me, maybe his madness would have found me willing. Well then, if I were willing had he wooed, I’ll woo myself. Can I speak out? Can I confess? Love will compel me! Yes, I can. Or if shame locks my lips, then I’ll reveal by private letter love my lips conceal.’… Poor girl, she passed any bounds, kept offering herself to his rebuffs, and soon, no end in sight, her brother fled, fled from his country and the scene of shame to found a city in a foreign land. Then Byblis was beside herself with grief. She beat herself in frenzy and down the tunic from her breast. Now she raved with no attempt to hide her hope of lawless love, and in despair forsook the home she hated and her father- land to trace her brother, find that fugitive …

“She was turned to a fountain, which

Byblis unspeakable desires

Her unspeakable desires…

She went to a nearby mountain and set about throwing herself off. But Nymphai, pitying her, held her back. Casting her into a deep sleep they changed her from a mortal to a deity, into a Nymphe called Byblis. They made her their companion and sharer of their way of life. The stream which flows from that rock is called to this day by local people the Tears of Byblis.”

Antoninus Liberalis, Metamorphoses 30

“Byblis, daushter of Miletus, out of love for Caunus her brother, killed herself.”

Hyginus, Fabulae 243 “[Miletos] built the battlements that keep their founder’s name; where, as she strolled beside Mae- ander’s windins banks, her father’s stream, that turns so often back upon its course, he joined in love a Nympha of beauty rare, Cyanee, who one day bore him there Byblis and Caunus, twins, a tragic pair. The tale of Byblis shows that giriş should love as law allows, Byblis who tost her heart to great Apolline